Godmothered: Updating Ideals and Fairy tales

Ra’al Ki Victorieux

The world of fairies is in danger of extinction because humans no longer believe in them and make wishes such as “be happy forever”: they have stopped believing. However, a fairy resists this situation and searches until she finds a 10-year-old girl who asked for help with a boy she likes. The fairy travels to earth and finds that this girl is now over forty, a woman who works for a television channel and has two daughters. How can the fairy make her see that work is not everything in life, that she is missing every day the opportunity to be happy and share that happiness with those she loves? She observes her, is patient, and has some phrases to motivate her, for example: “No princess is grumpy, it would do you good to wear a flower dress and do something to find your moment of happiness.” “You should go to the party, no great story starts with -and she was in pants, drinking wine in her living room,” etc. This 2020 American comedy is directed by Sharon Maguire, written by Kari Granlund and Melissa Stack from a Granlund story. The film stars Jillian Bell in the title role (the fairy godmother), and we find Isla Fisher (as Mackenzie).

GODMOTHERED

Godmothered is yet another film that “adapts” fairy tales to contemporary times. This adds to the number of works and films that have done it. For example: the animated film series “Shrek” turned the leading couple into ogres. Vivian Mansour Manzur in “Había una vez: Cuentos de cabeza y al revés” (Once upon a time: Tales upside down and backward), presents us with a different version of the classic tales, where the main characters, tired of always living the same thing, depart from the traditional script and experience strange situations. She introduces us to adults who act like children: The Astro, magician of invisibility on the playing field, surrenders to the scent of his inseparable little blanket; the elegant executive throws the worst tantrum of his life; The powerful president cannot sleep if they do not read him a fairy tale first, and thus, the characters reveal that the adult world is upside down. Also, the movie “Maleficent” starring Angelina Jolie portrays the betrayal which caused the coldness of this not so “bad woman.”

It is as if various authors and works seek to show us “another side of the coin” of the fairy tale system. We find some constants: a) They try to be less Manichean, that is, the bad guy reveals his kindness and those we had considered “good” show us their weaknesses. That is, they are more human characters, even within fantasy. b) They speak not only to children or adolescents, they include “adults” among their roles, thus incorporating problems such as divorce, betrayal, work, stress, the search for the inner child, etc.

The works that entertain us change, because societies are also transforming. We rethink the identities we adopt, gender roles, ideals and goals for life. At the end of the day, we realize that being human and wanting to be happy is something magnificently common, a dream that humanity has had for millennia, and is still seeking to achieve each day. A dream that is certainly not achieved by “drinking wine in pants in the living room”, but by cultivating what makes us happy, and valuing the time we share with those we choose to love.

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